NSM Protocol Directory
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NSM Protocol Directory

What do you Need in this Moment?

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 🫁 Restore Balance (Cadence Breathing)

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⏳ Recommended Timing

Twice per day for 10 minutes

The easiest method for practising cadence breathing is to sit upright or lay on your back. This gives you the best access to your spine (straight spine) and allows you to fill your lungs more completely.

If you feel like you might not be breathing fully into your belly a tip would be to start off lying down and place a small weight, perhaps a stone or something that weighs a kilo or two on your lower belly to create downward pressure on the lower diaphragm.

Personally I like to practice in the morning, after some kind of movement or stretching, sitting upright on a couple of cushions with my spine straight in the morning and then practice laying on my back in the evening when I'm unwinding with an emphasis on breathing into my lower belly, but I invite you to experiment here.

It also helps to set an external timer for this practice. I typically use the gong sound on an app called InsightTimer, but really anything will do.

You can also listen to binaural beats whilst practicing, I've recommended Cory Allen's beats or an app called Endel, both of which you can find a link to in the on-boarding guide.

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🦸‍♂️ Key Benefits

Increases blood oxygen saturation during rest, builds CO2 tolerance and also exercises baroreceptors which in turn increases heart rate variability.

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⚙️ Physiological Mechanisms

There are three aspects that you need to remember: your breathing should be Light, Slow and Deep. I'll say that again. Your breathing should be light slow and deep.

Why light? Well as mentioned above, the lighter breathing increases CO2 in your system which improves blood circulation, 02 delivery and also increases the concentration of nitric oxide which leads to a heightened feeling of calm.

Okay, second: why breathing slowly? The so-called perfect breath is actually about 5.5 seconds in, 5.5 seconds out for 5.5 breaths per minute. However most of us have a breathing rate of 14 breaths per minute or higher and studies have shown that this has actually been increasing over the past couple of decades.

If you have an Oura Ring it will tell you your respiratory rate per minute. If this is higher than 15 it's a sign of some dysregulation. When we breath more slowly, our vagus nerve is stimulated and what's known as 'baroreceptors' are stimulated which improves your heart-rate variability, which we'll be returning to in week 3.

Finally, why do we want to breathe deep—or breathing into the lower diaphragm. Well from the bio-mechanics, it not only helps with the slow breathing but also increases our lymphatic drainage and the muscle movement actually stimulates tiny neurons by the muscle movement in our lower belly and pelvic floor that signal a relaxation response. I'll add that many of us habitually do not breathe into our bellies or may be unsure how to even do this.

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👨‍🔬 Peer-reviewed Research
  • Mouth breathing: Adverse effects on facial growth, health, academics, and behaviour (link)
  • Functional Breathing lit review (link)

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 💧 Avoid Anxiety (Physiological Sigh)

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🦸‍♂️ Benefits

Immediately down-shifts the central nervous system into parasympathetic.

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⚙️ Physiological Mechanisms

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👨‍🔬 Peer-reviewed Research

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 🪨  Calm Down + Ground (Belly Stone Breath)

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 🐝 Relax + Recover from Eye-Strain (Voo-Hum)

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🦸‍♂️ Key Benefits
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⚙️ Physiological Mechanisms

Vibrations in sinus cavities produces nitric oxide + extended exhale downshifts the nervous system

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👨‍🔬 Peer-reviewed Research
  • "NO increased 15-fold during humming compared with quiet exhalation. In a two-compartment model of the nose and sinus, oscillating airflow caused a dramatic increase in gas exchange between the cavities...The data presented here indicate that humming is an extremely effective means of increasing sinus ventilation." (link)
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 🦍 Improve Interoception (A.P.E.)

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 🏄‍♂️  Feel through an Emotion (Somatic Surfing)

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🦸‍♂️ Key Benefits
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⚙️ Physiological Mechanisms
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👨‍🔬 Peer-Reviewed Research
Somatic experiencing: using interoception and proprioception as core elements of trauma therapy

Here we present a theory of human trauma and chronic stress, based on the practice of Somatic Experiencing® (SE), a form of trauma therapy that emphasizes guiding the client's attention to interoceptive, kinesthetic, and proprioceptive experience. SE™ claims that this style of inner attention, in addition to the use of kinesthetic and interoceptive imagery, can lead to the resolution of symptoms resulting from chronic and traumatic stress. This is accomplished through the completion of thwarted, biologically based, self-protective and defensive responses, and the discharge and regulation of excess autonomic arousal. We present this theory through a composite case study of SE treatment; based on this example, we offer a possible neurophysiological rationale for the mechanisms involved, including a theory of trauma and chronic stress as a functional dysregulation of the complex dynamical system formed by the subcortical autonomic, limbic, motor and arousal systems, which we term the core response network (CRN). We demonstrate how the methods of SE help restore functionality to the CRN, and we emphasize the importance of taking into account the instinctive, bodily based protective reactions when dealing with stress and trauma, as well as the effectiveness of using attention to interoceptive, proprioceptive and kinesthetic sensation as a therapeutic tool. Finally, we point out that SE and similar somatic approaches offer a supplement to cognitive and exposure therapies, and th...

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 👀 Reduce Overwhelm (3-2-1 Orienting)

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 🧘  Feel Calm in 7 mins (Stacking Protocols)

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 ❣️  Amplify Joy (Meditation)